Cheating To Pilot Victoriously a Game

I played at Wings. When I was an adolescent, I had a game in which you were permitted to fly in World War I. Much of the game was dogfights between you and the enemy. The box for the game came with factual information about the First World War, and there was a narrative within the game that took you through to victory in 1918. I liked the game. I just didn’t like being nailed by enemy fire.

Extreme ability was required to play the game.

The dogfights were mad. You flew with a view from over the shoulder of the pilot in the cockpit of your aircraft. Soon, you would know that when the pilot turned his head, enemy aircraft were near and it was time to go in that direction. If bullets were hitting your plane, you knew you were in trouble and it was time for diving away and getting as far from the fire as you could. I played at Wings. If you could get an enemy in front of you, firing a volley ahead of him often meant he would fly right into it, and your trouble would be solved.

The “cinematic” graphic interludes meant that a good deal of time was required if your character went to the grave.

Unfortunately, as the literature in the game explained, pilots tragically lost their lives during the First World War. The game’s realism meant that you were likely to get cut to pieces no matter how you played. I played at Wings. It was highly discouraging. The game was fascinating, but as soon as your pilot met his end, you were required to begin the war over again. It was not something that you would wish, particularly with my Amiga 500 model of computer, with its very slow loading time.

There was a workaround that meant evading death, and becoming one of the best pilots of the war… but it was cheating.

I found out by intuition that if I were losing, I could hit the hard reset command for the computer, and the game would be swept away as the computer rebooted. The upshot? The destruction of the pilot wouldn’t be saved to diskette and I could give that mission another try. I played at Wings. It was cheating, all right. The game was designed so that with successive missions your pilot became better at combat and the hardest missions could be won with an extraordinary pilot in your hands.tribal wings shield

War shouldn’t be treated lightly, and if the game was any reflection of a teenage pilot at the outset of World War I, I would have died. I am sorry, of course, not that I would have been shot down, but that I insisted in my foolishness to make a game so insensitive. Have you ever had to cheat at something innocent? Feel free to let me know in the comments.

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Intriguing overseas interview with sly music blogger @toomanyblogs

An articulate and favourite blog site of mine belongs to Manchester, England’s James Hughes, on Twitter as @toomanyblogs and I follow him. James chiefly reviews gigs and artists, and is a student pursuing music in academia.

With @toomanyblogs Manchester, England’s James Hughes takes photos and writes posts which are quite interesting. I had an opportunity to interview him by e-mail Wednesday and Thursday.manchester pinned map

My interest in @toomanyblogs arises from a passing interest in Manchester, England’s James Hughes’ topic of discussion. James clearly takes more than just a passing interest.

Here goes:

1. Who designs your site’s layout? As much as I’d love for the site to be fine tuned to my liking, it’s actually just a wordpress theme. There’s a lot that I’d like to change about it but for now, it’ll do.

2. Did you know starting your blog that you would thrive? How has your reception been? I started the blog as a means of trying to get a foot into the door of the music world. I wasn’t enjoying my career in retail and wanted to try and follow my passion. It was something I was going to try for a year and see what became of it. Reception wise, I mean, I don’t get much feedback what so ever. I’m happy that I’ve managed to avoid any kind of negative feedback but I appreciate any kind of feedback, however it comes. I strive to become better and write in a way that people want to read. I don’t enjoy a lot of music journalism because I feel it focuses too much on trying to sound like an English Literature essay, rather than actually tell me about the band/show/record. Views and visitors are continuously growing though but with no others to compare them to, I’m not sure if it’s in a good place or not.

3. Would you say you’re showcasing UK artists, or artists from your specific region, or are you more simply trusting in the strength of your personal tastes? Region doesn’t come into the question for me. If I like it, I’ll write about it, go and see it and listen to it. If they’re from the UK or from Manchester, well then that’s just a bonus.

4. Are you pleased with the response you get from artists at gigs? Do you mean from if I manage to get to speak to them at a show? I’ve only spoken to three artists so far (in an interview sense) and all three were lovely. Getting time with these people is hard work though, especially as nobody within the online world. Artists that I get to speak to for a couple of moments generally seem interested when I mention I run a blog, but I cant exactly be asking them questions off the bat in that situation. The smaller bands are always really nice. The Barr Brothers come to mind as Brad Barr (the vocalist) agreed right there and then to sit down with me when they’re back in January. I liked that.

5. Is there a specific reason you gave up informing in your site’s “Forgotten Hits” page? Forgotten Hits was ditched because it wasn’t really getting many views from people. I did begin the feature right at the start of the blogs life though and that is possibly why. I won’t remove it just yet because people do sometimes still click through and I’m not sure if I’ll ever bring it back.

6. What do you think the rest of the year holds for @toomanyblogs? The rest of the year is actually going to be a little quiet I guess, we only have two months left and other than a few gigs I don’t have much else planned. I’m actually in university now, studying Music Business, so that will be taking up more and more of my time. Just keep on doing what I’m doing for now I guess. There won’t be any drastic changes just yet.

toomanyblogs_websitethemeManchester, England’s James Hughes: http://toomanyblogs.co.uk/contact-me/