Discovering the Man of Steel #DiscoverWP

This week’s WordPress Discover Challenge presents the trial of posting a different point of view than what other people have, whatever POV. This appealed to me because I thought of Superman, as a matter of fact, from the films of the nineteen seventies and eighties about the beloved comic book character, and also from the 2013 film Man of Steel, which is what specifically I have a different interpretation to write about than the casual interpretation it often gets otherwise (a great superhero film).

Christmas Eve last year, December 24 of 2016, late in the afternoon my younger brother and his son went with me to my parents’ house for dinner and the Christmas tree. My brother let me know that the two had been in the middle of complaining about Superman, in the movies, and I was surprised that they have this opinion, which is not the same opinion I have. We’re very different people from one another.

Man of Steel presents the Superman character as an alien, which I know he is, as in the story of his life told in the 1978 film about him (titled Superman, naturally). However, whereas in that film Superman is a very human character, who blends in with his peers quite easily, in Man of Steel (2013) Superman is almost an alien monster, considering that while he looks human, he has the mentality of an outsider. This is clear, for example, when he only takes his job as a reporter for the Daily Planet at the conclusion of the film (spoiler), which is unlike Superman (1978), in which his entire time in Metropolis is spent in the alter ego of Clark Kent, a reporter alongside Lois Lane.

What I think about Man of Steel, which is different than how other people see it, is that Man of Steel is the story of an alien creature living among humans whose fate it is to help the human race. This is like how in ancient Egypt, Egyptian workers built enormous pyramids, which were probably tombs for their leaders once deceased (the Pharaohs). It is unknown how the ancient Egyptians were able to build these pyramids because there is no evidence that the Egyptians of ancient times had technology which could have made building those pyramids possible. It is a great mystery.

December 28, 2016
Les Anderson

One theory is that, as in history when impossible feats were accomplished without the benefit of technology, alien forces could have visited Egypt and helped the Egyptians build the pyramids with the help of the alien people’s technology. It is a popular theory among people who believe in life among the stars (Erich von Daniken is one scholar who argues that the theory is based on real history, of Ancient Egypt).

Given that the pyramids would have been nearly impossible to build without technology, consider that aliens visited and lent a helping hand, with an interest in contributing to the prosperity of human beings (as a species). Man of Steel is a little like that because Superman is an alien living among humans who has the fate of helping preserve the human race from dangers that are inherent to people encountering alien creatures.

July 12, 2015
Wil Stewart

What I think is that when Superman reveals himself to human authorities, when he is given the ultimatum to surrender by his enemies, it is noted that Superman may be a hazard for human folk merely because his body may contain a disease that could be inflicted on the humans. I say this because it is not immediately the fear of Superman’s powers as a superhero that bothers the authorities, or the details of Superman’s past in the Kansas town of Smallville, but whether Superman’s body could spread illness and death to the humans who meet him. I don’t think that the Egyptians meeting aliens who gave them help to build the pyramids, stopped their alien benefactors to question whether they would become sick from contact.

What I am thinking about Man of Steel, is what if the point of Superman’s existence among humans is that he doesn’t succeed at guiding human beings to a better existence? Every time it is questioned if humans in ancient times had visitors from other worlds among them, there is never evidence that the aliens caused devastation and ruin for people of the past. What if Superman’s role as a visitor to modern-day people of the world demonstrates good intentions on Superman’s part, but poor planning for the man from Krypton that actually reduce the success of people to safely maintain conditions for life around the planet? All I’m asking you to do is that when you sit down with Man of Steel, consider the possibility that while the strange realities that led the men and women of Ancient Egypt to construct pyramids, in this film, when Superman is battling and causing destruction in both Smallville and Metropolis, could this be the beginning of events that challenge human’s mastery of Planet Earth and undermine them in a way that will end in defeat and downfall? If Superman for once is the alien visitor closest to human beings in his physical form, could he likewise have the kinds of human weaknesses that will result in the end of human’s reign over their blue and green planet? Every other time in history that aliens might have come to help humans with the growth of their civilizations, are we, at last, to understand that there is no more? For however Superman feels about belonging to the human race, which is clearly passionate, considering the climax of the film when Superman is challenged by his nemesis how he feels about human life, if Superman is the final alien visitor to Earth, is it because he will eventually destroy us all? That is how I would understand Man of Steel, instead of interpretations that are more along the lines of a visitor from the stars who kindly brings the benefit of his superpowers to help us mortals.

December 18, 2015
The Korus

If you have an interest in what I am thinking, you’re welcome to “like,” follow, and/or subscribe. Thank you for reading and good luck to you, whatever you do. Take care of yourself as always.

Nominated to be queried for great young WordPress fun

WordPress thanked their bloggers for everything they did on the platform in 2016, I saw.  It was affirming, which is good if you enjoy ready validation.  I have to conduct myself with a degree of decorum which is necessary for all intents and purposes.  I don’t regret this at all.
Matthew matthew903.wordpress.com/2017/01/15 nominated me for a challenge, and while I am certainly late, I don’t mind posting something that is responsive.  It’s a growing experience, all the more because of what WordPress let us all know, and that is that they are inclusive.
l First, 2016 in 3 words… Disheartening.  Winding.  Dire.  Why do people like to characterize time with little descriptors like those?  They are a bit hard to think of.
l Second, who are the people who most moved us in the year behind (2016)?  I won’t name names, but I would offer up Ashtur-as, who is a bit imaginary and who accompanies me when I am out to count the steps I take.  I’ll think a little about Zop, too, which is a nickname for someone I hurt by mistake.
l Third, where have I seen beauty in 2016?  It’s typically the cemetery where I caretake the grounds.  I’m part of the operations for the spot, and that’s the reason I have to observe a level of respectability which I feel genuinely reflects who I am.
l Best food, ha, maybe my parent’s dinner dessert of chocolate cherry frozen yogurt.  I know I’m round.
l The event, fifth, that most affected my sense of consciousness about the world where I live (the one we’ve got) was Rogue One.  Everybody seems to have a lot to say about it.  I am preparing myself with reading material and the like before I even try to enter that universe mentally.
l The sixth avenue of inquiry, so to speak, is the finest purchase I made in 2016.  I’m not a materialist, I’m part of a not-for-profit.  I think this was the year I bought The 4-Hour Workweek by Tim Ferriss.  That was a good read that I took on a couple of times.

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My three good intentions, as the questions go, are to keep up the blogging I’m doing and remaining aware of our website at http://www.maplelawncemetery.org and to aim for more tweeting, even after February 3.  I want to get to a local branch of the public library in 2017 and I want to eat a St. Patrick’s Day milkshake again this year.
You’re welcome to like, follow, and/or subscribe if you think this kind of business is solid.  It’s in good fun.

Photo Challenge Entry, Ambience at Our Quiet Church

In the spirit of photographic art, many, many people have their hand in at taking digital pictures.  Life is routinely captured visually in an electronic format, and even if you, like me, are somewhat rudimentary in your ability to take a good photo, it doesn’t mean that inspiration never strikes.  The WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge is a blog series that offers help when it comes to gathering your wits at the sending end of a photograph.  Drawing inspiration from the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenges is useful, because both are you becoming part of a state of awareness surrounding photography and also that you are elevating your ideas to the level of relative expertise.
This week’s Challenge is on the subject of ambience, which is explored as a route to bringing up the mood of your audience by rendering photos which are full of excitement, as with light, for example, that can be enjoyed with the sense of sight and also reflected upon.  This week’s Challenge invites the post of an ambient photo, which for me is ideal as I always feel lucky when something I’ve snapped shows comparative ambience (to something duller).  I’m part of a nonprofit where I take photos of our grounds, because I’m there routinely, and I’m familiar with the place.
There’s a church and cemetery, to get to the point, where our nonprofit handles the caretaking and other duties.  We have a webpage:  http://maplelawncemetery.org
I’m also blogging, as you can clearly see, which is taking in interest in our operation in the capacity that it functions as a small business, and while we’re firmly a not-for-profit, it is the work we do of which we’re proud.  All this being said, I’ve selected a photo I took which is dated October 9, 2013.  Without much more to say, I present it here as part of this week’s photo challenge and it is below.  While I am not exclusively discussing our work as a not-for-profit, I will continue to blog regularly and if you have an interest in this, feel free to “like,” “follow,” and/or subscribe.  Thank you.
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It’s the Beginning of the New and the Time is Noted

Sacrifice is inevitable, and, really, loss is the essence of tragedy.  That’s why tears are shed, whether sacrifice is deliberate or not, and, in the end, when all is said and done, what was most dear to us is gone and never again to be had.  Have perspective.  Whatever we lose, no matter how hard we fought to earn it or how long we sweated to realize what we held close, the day comes when it goes and it is, I assert here with every intention to help you find your bearings, that it will disappear, and you may not even have a chance to say goodbye.
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Maybe we’re never ready.  What do we hold precious?  Whatever seems to us to be the best, what we positively cherish if we are among the lucky, people, animals, places, property… it all goes.  It can be gone in the wink of an eye.  What’s more, it will most likely be that we will never have known it at all, except in our memories.  There is no way around fate, I suspect.  We have opportunities to wield our hand and to stake claim to everything we felt we wanted, but if your guard slips but once and misfortune strikes, all of it can be taken away, and even if we do everything in our power to keep safe what we love, I think you must know that it will go, that nothing is forever.  You don’t have but once, I feel, and it doesn’t matter what else is taught you.
I want to tell you this with the best intentions.  You have but what amounts to today, and you have to strike, to hold, and to keep fast, and to love, because you can never can count on what’s ahead.  It doesn’t matter what controls you set for the future.  You will see this time go, and it will never return.  I thought I’d tell you, but it doesn’t matter if you heed.  The most I can do, I feel, is to let you know.
Today’s WordPress prompt is the word, “gone.”  If you sympathize with how I feel, if you “like” this blog post, let me know with the “like” button or by “following” and/or subscribing.  I didn’t want to be the one to tell you, but if you’re the same as me, you’re already here.