What Will Trends Be Like in 100 Years?

Today is the eighteenth anniversary of the death of my paternal grandfather Fred.  I wrote this post brazenly two years ago, and seeing it today I reflected that if I could curate it to make it more sensible, I would have something perhaps, that would be nearly palatable. 89AZTB8E5HI am asserting to you that I don’t read the Republic and the Law.

If you log into Facebook, you can see what’s trending on the Internet around the world.  If there is major news happening, that is summarized in the list of what’s trending.  If it isn’t such a hot day for the news, less pressing issues make the list of trends.

It is a quick and handy guide to what a majority says is happening.  No one knows precisely how the world will look a hundred years from now.  Quick spoiler:  there may have been years and years of global deflation.

By the twenty-second century, the best of economic theory may have disappeared. Following the failure of cryptocurrency, the idea of cash may be completely extinct. 1AA9897112What’s trending could resemble the pages of Plato’s The Republic of the fourth century B.C. as much as anything else.

The changing times could land us all amid a congress of ideas.  The “temple of a fair society” is nearly inevitable given equality in the sight of God and in the American Declaration of Independence (1776), with inequality in the distribution of income long since dismissed.  Humans will continue to enjoy an organized, interdependent society (just without the same economic tools we have to our advantage today).

Society won’t be grown out of Marxism a hundred years from now, but out of a right to life.  For Plato, social justice consisted of “giving every man his due” for which Plato’s student, Aristotle, used the term “proportionate equality.”  However, this isn’t written in the pages of any economics textbook.

The idea of reciprocity is a range of conventions spanning “market transactions to legislative mandates, tax codes, cultural norms, social pressures, and more” (ie, a fair society).  Plato’s foundational argument is informed by “science” and a return to Athens’ Golden Age is likely what is intended to unfold a hundred years from now.  Plato, in the Republic, divided the “soul” into three, “appetitive” (nutrition, sex, etc.), “spirited” (emotions, ambition, competitive urges, etc.), and a rational, reasoning element, which he viewed as the primary function.

Human societies contend with these challenges similarly, Plato believed, on the level that the concept of the soul parallels the structure of the society, and in the Republic, his ideal comprised three classes that corresponded to the three elements of our souls.  This is in contrast to Thomas Hobbes.

In the Leviathan (from the Hebrew word for sea monster) in 1651, Hobbes said: “I put for a general inclination of all mankind, a perpetual and restless desire of power after power that ceaseth only in death. And the cause of this is not always that a man hopes for a more intensive delight than he has already attained to…but because he cannot assure the power and means to live well…without the acquisition of more.”
–Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan: On the Matter Form and Power of a Commonwealth Ecclesiastical and Civil, [1651]

Do you agree what will come to pass a hundred years from now?   “Like” and/or “Follow”!

http://complexsystems.org/publications/equality-equity-and-reciprocity-the-three-pillars-of-social-justice/

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At Times Tweeting is an Uphill Battle

Looking at old posts from three years ago, I am concluding they are honestly terrible. compass rose Why did I think to write those?  At least it demonstrates some improvement that by most assessments I am by now not such a bad blogger.  Wow, those old posts were not good.

 

I have two avenues by which to proceed on social media; I can post content related to the operations of a cemetery, where I work, and I do, occasionally.  It doesn’t take a lot to keep to a Facebook page populated, and I can post a little with the help of DrumUp and craft the odd post I have designed myself and presto, an active Facebook page.

 

  • Trending:  should trending be the focus?  DrumUp claims it’s a number one research tool for identifying trending content for Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn (I’m pretty sure my LinkedIn account says I died).  

 

How does Twitter fit into the life equation as I understand it?  A tweet that’s worth a look takes a bit of work.  While it doesn’t come naturally to me, I like Twitter, and this is about how I tweet.  I concede that I cheat a little to make it work, and it’s grown a bit, and some days there are a few more followers, and some days a few less.

 

  • On letting authorities have their say

I can try more interesting topics than simply what I’m doing workwise.  On Twitter, the giant-sized accounts are authorities magnified by the weight of numbers they command.  

 

You know, an hour on Twitter is a portal to the world.  I have seen individuals shout out to the Twitter users with giant numbers of followers.  That is very bold.

 

I am always trying to learn.  If you are an expert, by all means, a comment is welcome.  I wish you all the best and good luck!

Waiting, The Milestone that Identifies Another Piece of the Puzzle

And why not return to blogging, I say? The weekend finds me reading Wednesday’s WordPress photo challenge, an essay on waiting. Also, the daily prompt is the word Overcome.

The photo challenge and the daily prompt have me going back a little in time to see what I have done with my camera that might prove workable, for the purposes of the WordPress Prompts & Challenges. I think of nature, typically.

August 23, 2017
Sky over Maple Lawn Cemetery in St. Catharines

I am starting with a cloudy churning sky, shot the twenty-third of August when the heavens above seemed to speak dismay as I helped take care of my duties at the cemetery where I work. You can see the trees on the crest of the hillside standing with authority, and stones beneath, marking the plots where the dead rest and where the living mark time.

It was near the end of summer, and I tend to think I am nearer that more than anything, as the days go. It’s not depressing, but always a reminder to keep active, to keep living.

It would be mad not to act because the consolation as it happens is what freedome we have, to do a little, a little more, and then some. The stake put up in a blog is for me the rather sociable activity of reflecting on the challenges and prompts, such that I’m thinking along the same lines as what other WordPress bloggers think about the same ideas. A few people relate, although maybe not all that many.

Waiting isn’t easy and the moments of waiting, when the time slips away a little more, are never to be recaptured. It is a madcap time in these days of remaining connected far and away, but it is also when I want to stop, for, I take it, all have the same experience, that we are merely waiting.

The inertia of waiting passes and we gravitate back to what is fulfilling. In the meanwhile, all I might do is take a photo of what feels elusive. Sometimes not even that, I guess.

February 22, 2017
Louth United Church 1429 Third Ave, St Catharines

My second photo is another in the spirit of the photo challenge, which is looking at how it is I get away from the church that oversees the cemetery there, the physical route. The photo hints at motion. This picture is from the twenty-second of February, two thousand and seventeen, and I wanted to get away from the cold that had everything in its grip and would not give.

I like the photo despite its flaws, for the long tree shadow that guards the exit from the church and cemetery. Winter holds the moment together and few brave the elements. I am there, however, in that place of calm and possibly eternity–only time will tell.

The photo challenge asks us how we can show how it is to wait and how we choose to deal with it. I like to think up an interaction between the weekly photo challenges and the daily prompts, such that the two overlap. It is hunting two birds with one stone.

There is a week’s relief from the photo challenges ahead–the Waiting essay is the last one for two weeks. It is a respite, I suppose.

.If you are interested in any of this, you can like, follow, and/or comment as it suits you. You can also investigate our cemetery further on Facebook, at
www.facebook.com/LouthUnited
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Thank you for visiting my blog. All the best.

Boundaries Challenge

How is it that we can direct ourselves to have boundaries?  How is that we can present and yet remain independent?

A golfer is bound by rules that determine how he drives the ball.  If a golf ball falls outside of play, a penalty is incurred.  I would attest there are boundaries in the real world which stop you in your tracks.

July 19, 2017

Boundaries contain, and keep you in the entirety of the whole amid which you are active.  Boundaries, I think today, are generally inflexible enough that your position remains in one spot, from which you are not to tread much further.  There is an art to subtly crossing them, and if you do persist in your advancement, you must continually drive back the idea that you are right about it, and that there has been no transgression.

Every individual is surely subject to boundaries.  We strive to maintain the largest boundaries which feel are ours, and we exercise caution when straying into new or otherwise unknown boundaries.  Each step we take is contained by boundaries, some of which exist solely in the mind of the one in motion, some of which are tangible outside that which the individual perceives.  It must be hoped it is evident you are undertaking the challenge of crossing them.

It is a grid, I think, that keeps us feeling “safe.”  Often, we are a part of a structure that is tacitly organized.  There are enough of us interested in remaining in place that we are evading the more turbulent sorts of disorder.

We count on others to remain regulated and to be interested in being regulated.  The grid is laden on us so that we have fewer problems by which we manage ourselves.  These grid phenomena are common to us.

DSCF8451

We feel we thrive if we see life in similar terms to what I am discussing as an advantage.  We enjoy ourselves best if we are cooperative with one another to keep us in check.  We know that if we tire of our environment, we are permitted to move on.

However, the most we readily accomplish is that we trade our circumstances, which keep us staying put, for similar though fresher digs.  Wherever are, we most often choose to remain inside the unit amid which we are already prospering, because we respect the place we’ve reached.  We enjoy what we have because there are so many chances to improve it.

It is here that we grow.  Boundaries can be creative.  Often, boundaries attain cohesion because so many people evince similar behavior.

More often than not, common characteristics among people mean we participate in similar activities at the same time and in the same way.  We check our boundaries, and we exercise them.

If you appreciate these ideas, you are welcome to click “Like” on this post and/or click “Follow.”  Comments are welcome as well.  Thank you for looking at my blog!  Good luck to you.

Unofficial Church Army

This week’s WordPress photo challenge is, oddly enough, about your personal moments of distraction when you are about practicing your self-discipline (i.e., when you are working).  I help a little with operations at a small cemetery in Ontario, in the city where I live.  We care for the grounds, etc. (you can find us on the Internet here).  However, to be totally honest, but it could be therapeutic, I am completely distractible by my own thoughts, which typically drift to my activities on the Internet, not so much Internet dating or the like, but being active on the Internet, and, more often, accessing music on the Internet.

 

It distracts me to no end and I begin to wish for it.

 

It is a terrible practice when I am expected to be solemn.  I regret this and try to conceal it.

 

However, for example… there is a church in front of the cemetery which disbanded in 2006 (you can find Louth United on Facebook here).  One of the thing that preoccupies is music by a band that was classic in the 1980s, The Church (see the similarity?  There’s a church.  I think about the song Under the Milky Way).  Even my mother has encouraged me to stop that.  However, I feel I am nearly part of what’s known as Church Army.  In fact, the other day I saw the band’s tweet announcing their North America tour of 2017.  Even though there is only one stop in Canada, and it is far west, in Vancouver, I thought I would put this in place because if you are in the United States, in a major center, here is when The Church is back in your town.

Church2017
2017 NORTH AMERICAN TOUR

I’ve thought about the possibility that I am doing a disservice to the religious, by speaking of The Church, who clearly utilize ideas about space and time in their music, which is somewhat heretical in the sense that ideas of that kind typically preclude a normal interest in God.  It really isn’t like that.  Steve Kilbey, who sings Under the Milky Way, knows quite a bit about Christian history, as I’ve observed in the blogging he’s done on his website The Time Being.  Other than that, he’s a major recording artist who has a classic song of the 1980s and he’s thoroughly cool.  I have that interest in him that I can’t shake, and it’s been years (feels like my whole life) that I’ve been feeling happy when I remember to play songs by his band The Church.  I realize that this is a far cry from what’s hip in my stretch of the sea, but I am consistently wowed by all the intellect, talent, and creativity that goes into Kilbey’s music, with and without The Church.  For example, Starfish from 1988, which includes Under the Milky Way, is full of great music that betrays that it’s a staple of the 1980s, but also a little more removed from stylistic touches that dominate most music of its day.  There was tons of tacky music in the 1980s.

 

Take a look at the tour poster for The Church in 2017 in North America.  You can find The Church on Twitter here.  If you are interested in any of this, feel free to ‘like,” “follow,” and/or “comment.”  Thank you for visiting and good luck this autumn.

Focus
Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Autumn Leaves, Favourite Memories, and Water Balloons

I have a nephew who this fall is beginning his university education at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.  I took classes at Queen’s University in 1996 and 1997.  We were reflecting this afternoon on Mack’s decision to move to Kingston for the university, me along with my parents, and with my brother’s wife, my nephew’s mother.

 

These days I have an occasional interest in photography and I take photos at the cemetery where I help tend the grounds.  You can find the website for our cemetery here.  It can be a quiet spectacle.  If I stand in the right spot, I can see the lay of the land, the stones jutting out of the ground beneath the colorful treetops.  When the Fall is here, though, we won’t have much time, because as the temperature drops we spend less and less time taking care of the outdoors, and we move inside the church on the property.

 

Louth United Church (disbanded 2006)
October 9, 2013

When I was a Queen’s University Freshman in the Fall of 1996, the students were told to represent their divisions, whether it was Arts & Science, where I was allotted, or Commerce, or Fine Arts, and so on.  One September day during Frosh Week the students were given balloons.  The balloons got to be filled with water, and soon we were in a game of water balloons, instructed to take on our rivals with a sneak attack, and threw water balloon after water balloon onto the other team.

 

While it wasn’t businesslike, it didn’t strike me as strange after the days of parading and getting to know the campus of the school.  What was a bit nonsensical, and I know I’m honestly a bit nonsensical myself, is that after the water balloon launch, my team were sat down in a lecture hall and admonished for doing such a lowly thing!  A girl, more experienced, took the podium and told us how far we’d sunk for interfering with the flow of the Frosh Week.  Novice though I was, I was astonished at the lesson we were being given.

 

My pride was injured.  I felt the sting of rebuke as I sat and heard the bad of what we had done.  As we took off after the lecture, most of us probably indifferent to the foolishness that had come down on us, I personally was a little more stiff with anger, and also on a path to greater rebelliousness.  It didn’t seem like irony to me that we had played this prank, and been caught.  It had been part of the fun, and it was wrongful.

 

I don’t reflect on this much, although I think now it was a lesson in doing the right thing and in showing respect.  Perhaps it wasn’t; I should have asked if the girl who handed down to us the words of shame was taking advantage of an opportunity, and what was behind her stern talk.  Nowadays, I snap photos and write and blog and participate in social media.  I’ve mostly forgotten about what happened with me and the other Arts & Science Frosh and the water balloons.

 

Maple Lawn Cemetery
October 9, 2013

The leaves at the cemetery change color, of course, and it is a passing joy to capture the image.  Even without a photographic record, it is a calming presence at the cemetery as the green disappears.  The days cool off slowly, and we take our time keeping the grounds in order.  Fall is a lovely season and a favorite time of year for me.  I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Like Sunshine the Future is Welcome

WordPress provides a series of supportive prompts, including Daily Prompts which these days are typically one word, designed to get participating bloggers writing about similar themes at the same time (often unbeknownst to one another).  I check the Daily Prompt when I think of writing a blog post, and today’s prompt is the word, “glaring,” which interests me because I immediately think of what is glaring that is obvious.  I relate the word glaring to the phrase glaringly obvious.  The prompt is here:  glaring

 

I think some about video, which is an extraordinary innovation in 2017, and which is provided for consumers at many levels, both amateur and professional (and in between).  The word video, as I understand it, typically refers to video content, which is videos that are assembled in relative entirety, or in sequential formats, possibly to inform, and often to entertain.  For example, the king of social media, Facebook, is debuting today original video inside the “Watch” tab on your Facebook account.  I presume this debut is coming across the U.S., but I think I have to wait to teach myself the “Watch” tab rather than seek out too much additional instruction (and thus feel the element of surprise), as I am at home in Canada.  You can learn a little more about the “Watch” tab on Facebook in the U.S. here:  https://techcrunch.com/2017/08/09/facebook-watch/

 

00001. While the news doesn’t make the same waves in Canada, it is just one more aspect of video in 2017 that indicates that if you are marketing content for business purposes, you need to be afield in video content.  Personally, I help operate a not-for-profit with a small following on Facebook, and while we’re short of the mark where the potential to show video content exists, at least we are somewhat informed as to what is happening with small business and the Internet and we are persisting with some hopes for video in the future.  Visit us here:  

https://www.facebook.com/LouthUnited

A summer funeral
Peter checks that the cemetery plot is complete the day of the funeral.

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