Blog Challenge Argumentative

What seems free may have strings attached.

I wrote the first version of this post within the last year.  As part of a semi-weekly exercise in curating the blog posts I’ve written which I continue to think could have some potential (!), I have returned to this post with an interest in making it more accurate.

 This month in the United States the FCC will vote whether to repeal the legislation protecting net neutrality, and the Internet will likely become controlled in that nation by ISPs including Verizon, Comcast, and AT&T.  This means that some websites will function better (swifter) than others.  That isn’t good for the free speech of the Internet.

 What I wrote on St. Patrick’s Day of 2016 that remains true is this:  Some are in the dark about what could result from the lack of Internet controls generally enjoyed in the present.  I went on to say:  What seems free may have strings attached.

flag, united states, us, clouds, sky, freedom, democracy, flag pole, sovereignty, state, nation, country
Photographer: Christopher Burns

 

The literal price tag of any given service often includes only the bare essentials as they are understood. To thrive, a few dollars here and there (on apps, plug-ins, hardware, etc.) may be required, and the economic definition of scarcity surely applies here. For the desired recognition, I venture to guess that once more as in other similar situations money talks.

 This sounds like I am in favor of the repeal the FCC is likely doing, but I was actually only being facetious.  However, this does resemble in some fashion the reality what is going to happen in many Internet markets (most notably in the US).  To be competitive, without legislation to protect the free Internet, there are going to be requirements to “pay” (i.e., to spend for services) where presently it is a level playing field.

 

I mistakenly believed it was a right to privacy that would be contested, and while there has been such a battle, which is ongoing, but a clearer picture of how it is the Internet remains usable is not unlike what I wrote on that St. Patrick’s Day:  If you are subpar, you will be told as much as an army of folk waiting to raise their spears are as much the wolves at the door as Mom and Dad were in the old days. You need to excel or, plain and simple, you will be failing hard and failing fast.

 

Nothing ventured, nothing gained, but it is crucial that you learn from your mistakes as they happen to you. Own them and learn, and put them to rest with a dash more of hope for having conquered something, at least.  I always think that trying and failing is better than not to have tried an effort at all.

 Red and Green Alert Buttons

You need to bring to bear content, which is the substance of media as it’s understood on the Internet with an eye to generating traffic for your particular je ne sais quoi. You need to be real and you need to think smart, and the end result has to be a brand that is somehow recognizable on the Internet if you want to earn turf in cyberspace.

 I have put it in fancy language because I think it is a fancy thing, I wrote.  The need to argue for net neutrality is serious.  More than a few think the devil be damned and enjoy the occasional spotlight as it illuminates the crowd, I said.

 

You should accept that the decision to repeal the FCC legislation protecting net neutrality is a problem for those who count on their voices behind heard on the Internet and that the future will begin to be controlled by corporations, not individuals.  That is often the prize for the amateur designer, the potential and the possibility.

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Requirement To Proceed Gingerly is Essential

We have to worry about the weather. Most of our volunteers are senior citizens and they walk very gingerly.

Alberta Stima

Alberta is right, that treating senior citizens gingerly isn’t always easy.  While some remain young at heart and reasonable, others are less capable, frankly, in some situations.

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https://pythom.com/New-10-Pitch-511-on-EEOR-Near-Canmore-is-Alt-Left-2017-10-21-34716

I’m in operations at a not-for-profit cemetery (in fact, you can find us elsewhere on the Internet at http://maplelawncemeteryorg.ipage.com/oldchurchcemetery/24701.html).  It is somewhat taxing doing such funeral work, but the serenity of the environment and the relative freedom I have in addition to the work I do make it worthwhile.

 

November 28 of this month celebrates Giving Tuesday, which is like a holiday for not-for-profits (chiefly in the US, but elsewhere as well, I should think).  I am posting to Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/LouthUnited) as well as to Twitter (my page is https://twitter.com/findingenvirons).  It is true that Twitter is busy unrolling its new vision for its tweets.

 

The new tweets will be up to two hundred and eighty characters in length compared to how they were, for ten years, which was tweets up to a hundred and forty characters.  I am not sure how Twitter will fare in the future with this disregard for tradition (a decade’s tradition) evident.

 

Many Internet users rely on Facebook, and on Twitter, for their news (as in the case, for example, they wish to be good citizens).  Twitter’s reputation will most likely change as new developments there come up, but while Twitter appeals to someone like me, whose forty years old and been on the Internet since before the days of Napster, it is discouraging.

 

If I were to relent a little for the sake of a greater good for my family, who are supportive of the decisions I make, and for the cemetery, which is operated efficiently and consistently, perhaps I would abandon Twitter now.  I don’t want to, however.

 

Today’s WordPress Daily Prompt is the word gingerly and because I think the WordPress prompts are great, I thought I would venture to blog again thoughts I have.

#GivingTuesday Ambassadors for Maple Lawn Cemetery

As a kid, I got to trick-or-treat.  It’s what a kid thinks of as being cool.  I have my mother’s skill–at times she lent assistance to costumes that helped me fit in for the walkabout going door-to-door.

 

I think it always seemed to feel shorter than it was.  The other disappointment was reaching adolescence.  It was no longer very advisable to try trick-or-treating if you were too big for your breeches.  You’d see those porch lights go dark.

 

Four years ago my father decided that in his retirement years he would take on the responsibility of operating a little cemetery on the outskirts of town (doesn’t that sound like it’s from a horror script or something of that kind?) and we are partners in the cemetery’s operation, although generally speaking, he is the boss.  Is it ghoulish?

 

Well, it kind of is.  Not everybody could handle it.  For me, it is nice to be part of an operation of that kind, and I feel I’m inclined to do it.

 

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Wednesday, March 13, 2013 8:36 AM

November 28 is known among not-for-profits as Giving Tuesday, and it is like a holiday for charities, when they ask for gifts.  There’s only a couple of things that are pressing on us.

 

For example, when the car lost control and drove into the tree out by the church, it tapped the sign for the church and one of the legs of the sign was cracked nearly in two.  Getting a new sign would be nice, although our budget is strictly limited to operations.  It does require replacement, however.

 

We don’t make much doing what we do.  It isn’t entirely true that we scrape by, but we’re not getting rich.

 

We’re comfortable and we’re honest, given that we deal with funeral practices on a regular basis and we understand that discretion is required, as is respect and common decency.  We’re Christian people.

 

It isn’t necessary to help, but if you have any interest in the ghoulish, and you would like to help by becoming a fan of our Facebook page, retweeting my tweets about November 28, or reblogging this post, you are welcome to leave a comment expressing that you would like to be a Maple Lawn Cemetery ambassador.  We’re on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LouthUnited and my twitter handle is @findingenvirons  We also have a website that you can click through to see with http://maplelawncemeteryorg.ipage.com/oldchurchcemetery/

 

Although Giving Tuesday is six years running, this is the first year I’ve decided to try my hand at participating in it.  It’s not a race, it’s just that with the damaged sign, and even the wear and tear on the John Deere that I employ to assist with the operation of the cemetery, any help at all would be appreciated.  If you are a freelance creative, and you work for cheap, you are welcome to inquire if you think your talent would fit in with what my father and I are doing on the Internet.

 

Naturally, even if your thoughts for the season are all about Hallmark, I understand completely, and you are more than welcome to like this post or even to follow the blog.

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Wednesday, December 17, 2014 11:40 AM

Have an amazing Halloween in 2017, and maybe we’ll even see you back in 2018.  I wish you good tidings.

What Will Trends Be Like in 100 Years?

Today is the eighteenth anniversary of the death of my paternal grandfather Fred.  I wrote this post brazenly two years ago, and seeing it today I reflected that if I could curate it to make it more sensible, I would have something perhaps, that would be nearly palatable. 89AZTB8E5HI am asserting to you that I don’t read the Republic and the Law.

If you log into Facebook, you can see what’s trending on the Internet around the world.  If there is major news happening, that is summarized in the list of what’s trending.  If it isn’t such a hot day for the news, less pressing issues make the list of trends.

It is a quick and handy guide to what a majority says is happening.  No one knows precisely how the world will look a hundred years from now.  Quick spoiler:  there may have been years and years of global deflation.

By the twenty-second century, the best of economic theory may have disappeared. Following the failure of cryptocurrency, the idea of cash may be completely extinct. 1AA9897112What’s trending could resemble the pages of Plato’s The Republic of the fourth century B.C. as much as anything else.

The changing times could land us all amid a congress of ideas.  The “temple of a fair society” is nearly inevitable given equality in the sight of God and in the American Declaration of Independence (1776), with inequality in the distribution of income long since dismissed.  Humans will continue to enjoy an organized, interdependent society (just without the same economic tools we have to our advantage today).

Society won’t be grown out of Marxism a hundred years from now, but out of a right to life.  For Plato, social justice consisted of “giving every man his due” for which Plato’s student, Aristotle, used the term “proportionate equality.”  However, this isn’t written in the pages of any economics textbook.

The idea of reciprocity is a range of conventions spanning “market transactions to legislative mandates, tax codes, cultural norms, social pressures, and more” (ie, a fair society).  Plato’s foundational argument is informed by “science” and a return to Athens’ Golden Age is likely what is intended to unfold a hundred years from now.  Plato, in the Republic, divided the “soul” into three, “appetitive” (nutrition, sex, etc.), “spirited” (emotions, ambition, competitive urges, etc.), and a rational, reasoning element, which he viewed as the primary function.

Human societies contend with these challenges similarly, Plato believed, on the level that the concept of the soul parallels the structure of the society, and in the Republic, his ideal comprised three classes that corresponded to the three elements of our souls.  This is in contrast to Thomas Hobbes.

In the Leviathan (from the Hebrew word for sea monster) in 1651, Hobbes said: “I put for a general inclination of all mankind, a perpetual and restless desire of power after power that ceaseth only in death. And the cause of this is not always that a man hopes for a more intensive delight than he has already attained to…but because he cannot assure the power and means to live well…without the acquisition of more.”
–Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan: On the Matter Form and Power of a Commonwealth Ecclesiastical and Civil, [1651]

Do you agree what will come to pass a hundred years from now?   “Like” and/or “Follow”!

http://complexsystems.org/publications/equality-equity-and-reciprocity-the-three-pillars-of-social-justice/

At Times Tweeting is an Uphill Battle

Looking at old posts from three years ago, I am concluding they are honestly terrible. compass rose Why did I think to write those?  At least it demonstrates some improvement that by most assessments I am by now not such a bad blogger.  Wow, those old posts were not good.

 

I have two avenues by which to proceed on social media; I can post content related to the operations of a cemetery, where I work, and I do, occasionally.  It doesn’t take a lot to keep to a Facebook page populated, and I can post a little with the help of DrumUp and craft the odd post I have designed myself and presto, an active Facebook page.

 

  • Trending:  should trending be the focus?  DrumUp claims it’s a number one research tool for identifying trending content for Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn (I’m pretty sure my LinkedIn account says I died).  

 

How does Twitter fit into the life equation as I understand it?  A tweet that’s worth a look takes a bit of work.  While it doesn’t come naturally to me, I like Twitter, and this is about how I tweet.  I concede that I cheat a little to make it work, and it’s grown a bit, and some days there are a few more followers, and some days a few less.

 

  • On letting authorities have their say

I can try more interesting topics than simply what I’m doing workwise.  On Twitter, the giant-sized accounts are authorities magnified by the weight of numbers they command.  

 

You know, an hour on Twitter is a portal to the world.  I have seen individuals shout out to the Twitter users with giant numbers of followers.  That is very bold.

 

I am always trying to learn.  If you are an expert, by all means, a comment is welcome.  I wish you all the best and good luck!

Waiting, The Milestone that Identifies Another Piece of the Puzzle

And why not return to blogging, I say? The weekend finds me reading Wednesday’s WordPress photo challenge, an essay on waiting. Also, the daily prompt is the word Overcome.

The photo challenge and the daily prompt have me going back a little in time to see what I have done with my camera that might prove workable, for the purposes of the WordPress Prompts & Challenges. I think of nature, typically.

August 23, 2017
Sky over Maple Lawn Cemetery in St. Catharines

I am starting with a cloudy churning sky, shot the twenty-third of August when the heavens above seemed to speak dismay as I helped take care of my duties at the cemetery where I work. You can see the trees on the crest of the hillside standing with authority, and stones beneath, marking the plots where the dead rest and where the living mark time.

It was near the end of summer, and I tend to think I am nearer that more than anything, as the days go. It’s not depressing, but always a reminder to keep active, to keep living.

It would be mad not to act because the consolation as it happens is what freedome we have, to do a little, a little more, and then some. The stake put up in a blog is for me the rather sociable activity of reflecting on the challenges and prompts, such that I’m thinking along the same lines as what other WordPress bloggers think about the same ideas. A few people relate, although maybe not all that many.

Waiting isn’t easy and the moments of waiting, when the time slips away a little more, are never to be recaptured. It is a madcap time in these days of remaining connected far and away, but it is also when I want to stop, for, I take it, all have the same experience, that we are merely waiting.

The inertia of waiting passes and we gravitate back to what is fulfilling. In the meanwhile, all I might do is take a photo of what feels elusive. Sometimes not even that, I guess.

February 22, 2017
Louth United Church 1429 Third Ave, St Catharines

My second photo is another in the spirit of the photo challenge, which is looking at how it is I get away from the church that oversees the cemetery there, the physical route. The photo hints at motion. This picture is from the twenty-second of February, two thousand and seventeen, and I wanted to get away from the cold that had everything in its grip and would not give.

I like the photo despite its flaws, for the long tree shadow that guards the exit from the church and cemetery. Winter holds the moment together and few brave the elements. I am there, however, in that place of calm and possibly eternity–only time will tell.

The photo challenge asks us how we can show how it is to wait and how we choose to deal with it. I like to think up an interaction between the weekly photo challenges and the daily prompts, such that the two overlap. It is hunting two birds with one stone.

There is a week’s relief from the photo challenges ahead–the Waiting essay is the last one for two weeks. It is a respite, I suppose.

.If you are interested in any of this, you can like, follow, and/or comment as it suits you. You can also investigate our cemetery further on Facebook, at
www.facebook.com/LouthUnited
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Thank you for visiting my blog. All the best.

Boundaries Challenge

How is it that we can direct ourselves to have boundaries?  How is that we can present and yet remain independent?

A golfer is bound by rules that determine how he drives the ball.  If a golf ball falls outside of play, a penalty is incurred.  I would attest there are boundaries in the real world which stop you in your tracks.

July 19, 2017

Boundaries contain, and keep you in the entirety of the whole amid which you are active.  Boundaries, I think today, are generally inflexible enough that your position remains in one spot, from which you are not to tread much further.  There is an art to subtly crossing them, and if you do persist in your advancement, you must continually drive back the idea that you are right about it, and that there has been no transgression.

Every individual is surely subject to boundaries.  We strive to maintain the largest boundaries which feel are ours, and we exercise caution when straying into new or otherwise unknown boundaries.  Each step we take is contained by boundaries, some of which exist solely in the mind of the one in motion, some of which are tangible outside that which the individual perceives.  It must be hoped it is evident you are undertaking the challenge of crossing them.

It is a grid, I think, that keeps us feeling “safe.”  Often, we are a part of a structure that is tacitly organized.  There are enough of us interested in remaining in place that we are evading the more turbulent sorts of disorder.

We count on others to remain regulated and to be interested in being regulated.  The grid is laden on us so that we have fewer problems by which we manage ourselves.  These grid phenomena are common to us.

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We feel we thrive if we see life in similar terms to what I am discussing as an advantage.  We enjoy ourselves best if we are cooperative with one another to keep us in check.  We know that if we tire of our environment, we are permitted to move on.

However, the most we readily accomplish is that we trade our circumstances, which keep us staying put, for similar though fresher digs.  Wherever are, we most often choose to remain inside the unit amid which we are already prospering, because we respect the place we’ve reached.  We enjoy what we have because there are so many chances to improve it.

It is here that we grow.  Boundaries can be creative.  Often, boundaries attain cohesion because so many people evince similar behavior.

More often than not, common characteristics among people mean we participate in similar activities at the same time and in the same way.  We check our boundaries, and we exercise them.

If you appreciate these ideas, you are welcome to click “Like” on this post and/or click “Follow.”  Comments are welcome as well.  Thank you for looking at my blog!  Good luck to you.