The Fighting Irish

· Today’s my birthday, and I wanted to do something on the blog to have a touch of festivity, so when I got home after a bit I looked at this week’s Photo Challenge.  Krista Stevens is the author of this week’s challenge–hi, krista!–and she put on the cover page of the challenge a question there and then about what hobby the visitor would rather be doing.

My computer to me is like a Battletech, out of the game of Battletech that I played some as a teenager pitting one Battletech against another.  However, I’m not interested in turning my particle projection cannon on you, only giving you words afield.

· I eventually settled on a photo of my statuette of st. Patrick, standing in front of a shelf of tumbled books.  Would that I could drive snakes!  Rather than be prepared to meet the weekly photo challenge on WordPress, I could be curing sorrows.

St. Patrick

· I am looking forward to facebook today, to see if any of my friends on facebook write me birthday wishes.  There could be a few posts of that kind.

· I am also excited about a rumored change starting the twenty-third of March, where Twitter is beginning the order that only one out of every three days can be utilized by automated tweets.  It means that being the unofficial social media manager of our nonprofit is getting easier–I won’t have to say so much!

Despite that sentiment, I do enjoy writing a brief exposition and publishing it along with a photo for the blog.  Why else would I have such a tool?  Some bloggers are very good and even though I am dedicated to helping operate a non-profit there is sometimes a component of mentorship (on the Internet, it is always a good practice to help make comfortable a newbie).


Suddenly It Will Be the Spring of 2018

Suddenly, another year went by–my birthday is the fifteenth of March.

My niece is enjoying childhood, my nephew is on campus beginning to study to become a teacher. He’s on the same campus where I did the first year of my college diploma.

Today’s WordPress Daily Prompt is the word Suddenly and that is how my birthday in 2018 is finding me–not just this year went suddenly–it could be said the last six years went suddenly. Time moves radically fast, I think.

Aug 12, 2014
Psychology textbook

My biggest supporter vocally of my blog is my mother. It’s my belief, as I feel it is of others, that everyone needs to have a blog. WordPress is inclusive and that means that everyone optimistically can enjoy the equality of inclusiveness, however the situation in the “real world,” offline.

I rounded out the end of 2017 by taking part in the free ten-day WordPress course Developing Your Eye I, where I practiced taking photos until I got a little better. An example of the response I get from Mom is that she decided when I was going into the course she felt, I interpreted what she said as meaning that by learning a little more I was indeed on the right track. Her favorite blog post I’ve written is What We Bear Intuitively Has Its Spark Ahead.

When I was in high school taking Grade 12 English, the teacher Ms. Mayberry said to our class one day that your mother can drive you crazy. I know she was talking to the girls, but it remains true that sometimes the best wisdom you have are the lessons you learned as a youth from your mother.

Mom will also be the biggest cheer squad I have on the day of my birthday itself, getting older and older as I am.

I hope to keep up the pace as a blogger and keep it at the forefront of my mind as a hobby and an enthusiasm. I am grateful not only to my mother but also to everyone else who is generous enough with their time to respond. Thank you dearly.

Today’s Forgiving Fridays: You are so beautiful gave me the idea to remember my birthday in today’s blog post.


Doggedly Capturing Developing Your Eye Themes To Ring in the New Year

Happy New Year!  It is the beginning of 2018, of course.


To better myself a tad, I am doing a free ten-day photography course from WordPress, and while I am a week late, the timing isn’t too bad because I am literally ringing in the New Year with exercises in photography that I wouldn’t otherwise have thought to do.


Today’s exercise is to take a photo of something big.


To illustrate the theme, I thought of some symbolism.  You see, I went to the park, where there is a library, aquatic center, and playground.  You can see a Canadian flag flying as well.  The nation of Canada is, of course, massive, and that is one component of the symbolism of the photo.


A “big” park on New Year’s Day
  • The aquatic center is comprised of what is probably an Olympic-sized swimming pool, which is a big space for water.


  • To a child, the playground in the park is “big,” for the reason that a child is small.  It cannot be reasoned the same with adult eyes, but I feel it helps symbolize bigness all the same.


  • Last but not least, the volumes of knowledge inside the library represent a massive amount of information, which I feel represents the idea of big.  In fact, as today is New Year’s Day, and folks are beginning the start of a resolution (or more), one suggestion you may wish to try is to resolve to read more in 2018.  If you aren’t a regular reader all ready, I would ask if you feel you waste time on social media.


This is not to say that social media isn’t a lot of fun; it is.


It is just that if you find you are wasting time with social media, you may wish to resolve for 2018 to trade the time spent on social media for time spent reading.  Whether to try something like that is up to you.


Once again, happy new year.  I am glad I am able to share it.  Have a bountiful 2018!

Be That You Would Rather Risk Temporary Shelf Life

WordPressBen Huberman, who contributes essays to the WordPress photo challenges, wrote that bloggers interested yet should focus on the idea of Temporary, how it is things can be seen in the image that will no longer be there, as with autumn leaves in October.


What does it take to start a blog?  Three years ago I thought to learn a little more about writing a poem from Ben and others.


The free verse you might write could go in a blog, on the Internet.  I never changed my mind https://findingenvirons1.wordpress.com/2015/02/25/drawer


Letting it out of the bag was a busy time.  I looked back at a photo I took Wednesday, October 15, 2014, when I was purer as a blogger, meaning not seen as many (there are a lot of good ones).


It’s the trees shielding the cemetery and you can see the lane running behind Louth United Church.  Ben seems to be an understated champion of photography and also of blogging, with WordPress.


It is always nice to see what he has written when there is a photo challenge to join, on a Wednesday of the week.  There is a week to do it but people get started right away, I’m sure.  I would argue, if necessary, that the video capture look of the sky overhead reflects the idea of temporary all the more because everything that was in the sky has passed on, not content to be captured.


Wednesday, October 15, 2014 1:40 PM

We care for Maple Lawn Cemetery once a week and we’re active on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/LouthUnited  Yesterday Twitter began to include tweets with a character length of two hundred and eighty rather than plain a hundred and forty.  I don’t know what that says about the future… or the past, either.

Being Artificial on Social Media

Forging a representation of yourself for the Internet is rampantly common and has been for a long time.  On social media, you craft Internet content that reflects who you are as an individual.  When you post to Facebook, or to Twitter, or to YouTube, or to any other platform, you have an opportunity to render artificial something that is real in your life.


This is kind of an evaluation of your everyday life experience, and in the process of translating it for the Internet, it is like aiming a throw against the palisade of the other.

rock, formation, building, architecture, sky, sea, ocean, water, coast, hill, castle
Photographer: Igor Ovsyannykov

When thinking of creative methods by which you translate your life onto social media, you have an ability and a freedom to craft content that is representative of you, while being artificial in format.  Your life is real, as real as you experience it, and with social, you are tapping into a real-world experience for the purpose of consumption by the other.


There is nothing completely real about posting on social, yet it is viewed as an offshoot of real life because you are inherently human.  Therefore the urge to render your life on social has the weight that you’re growing content out of the experience you have offline.  It wouldn’t be artificial if it were really happening.


What’s more, however, the urge to render your life on social media means that you grow your content out of experiences you have in real life.  You are translating your experience offline into content that the other can digest and reflect upon, to view how you are instead of he or she, between human beings.  There is no algorithm that can match this ability.


Social media forms content grown from life, but rendered artificial inasmuch as it is only one representation of what has happened to you in your life, the impetus of real life.  Feel free to “like” this post or to comment, and/or to “follow” the blog if you found this post thoughtful.  I hope for you that your own social goes well for you and that the best moments in your life are conferred as though they were vitally important, which they are.


You are an individual and you have an opportunity to celebrate the best of what happens to you.

Thinking I Have Been Misguided

Late in June this year, I had the good fortune to read an interesting 2007 Live from the NYPL interview with filmmaker Werner Herzog


The films the chronographer points to include Nosferatu the Vampyre, Aguirre the Wrath of God, and Fitzcarraldo, three films which I viewed quietly when I was in college when such things were far less frequently available.  One of my college essays included observations about Herzog, and, perplexingly enough, my teacher mentioned to me the last we spoke that the young gentleman was planning to write a book about Herzog, to establish himself as a writer (and as a “serious” academic).  The interview in the literary journal here recounts Herzog’s observation on adventure:  “I cannot stand the term adventure nowadays–I lower my head and charge–it has degenerated into such an obscenity that you can go to the travel agency and book an adventure trip to New Guinea, to the headhunters, to the cannibals.”

I was reminded of my June 24 post- https://findingenvirons1.wordpress.com/2017/06/24/what-might-have-been-adventure-can-show-the-rust/ which was titled with the unfortunate word Adventure.  I have thought how I can correct the mistaken impression, but to the post’s credit, it did receive the favor of a blogger with a much larger profile than I have got myself.  beautybeyondbones you should read, and you can find what she was characteristically saying on her own blog this summer (it is hard hitting):  


Compared to me, she’s very good.

Yesterday my nephew to move to his new college town, and while we’re not close I am interested to see how he will do (he anticipates he will become a teacher).  He has his own dorm room now and his studies will shortly begin, once he has acclimatized to being in his new life situation.

Bryce House
Jean-Royce Hall

I think how hard it is to be by and large confined to the area which is local.  Personally, I am not easily discouraged, but I think compared to beautybeyondbones, who has gone through tremendous suffering and come back strong, it is a daunting outcome to contemplate being powerful enough to effect insight.  I sometimes tweet links to articles that argue for the relative merits of blogging, and I feel the odd person who could click through what trending posts I share on Twitter may occasionally see something that works for him (or her).  

You can find me on Twitter:  https://twitter.com/findingenvirons

There is a plenitude of blogging advice available on the Internet, but the best advice I know of is this tidbit.  You should not tell people what to post.

Any passion, any ingredient for inventiveness or what is usually referred to as authenticity, should not be filtered out of an individual’s content for the sake of conveying expertise.  It is not a good idea.

I shall include another photo, which I think implies transience, simply which inspired the blog post which beautybeyondbones saw, impressing me greatly.  If you are of a mind that this is favorable to you, feel free to “like,” “comment,” and/or “follow.”  I seldom know what this will turn up, but I was moved by the Werner Herzog interview.

Uploaded 5 October 2015
Freeway exit

Photography Challenge Finding an Understated Structure

Struggling with the unseemly requires an extra serving of common sense.  Putting the Grammarly app up on your desktop browser with the intention of evaluating your own writing is an example.  It speaks to critical issues.


The folk at Grammarly would have you think you can proudly check your writing on your phone and get it revised at the last minute so it fits the mold, it becomes right where it was flawed, effectively it makes sense.  Do you typically compose your writing on your phone?  No, you do it elsewhere, and I won’t spend a moment telling you where.


This week’s photography challenge is a charming essay about structure, published the thirtieth of August.  The structure essay instructs to observe and then to photograph so that we are shown what was mostly invisible, yet necessary.  The thing to observe is made evident by the photo that captures it, which I know makes the photo somewhat of a bombastic wisp, because what for the most part wasn’t there is now at once what we are seeing.


There will be many photographic blog posts that explore how unseen structure can be interesting, even captivating.  I hope I get to take a look at a few of them or more because sometimes they are charming, that is seeing the photos and understanding a little about why the photographer made the decision to add the photo to his or her blog.  Photographers challenged by the essay are a community, and I remember from when I made the change on my blog to go to the safety of the daily prompts and the weekly photo essay challenges how my experience of publishing my blog posts came of age and hesitantly began to seek welcome, as similar processes in the minds of bloggers fascinated by bloggers do entangle.

 Sunday, September 3, 2017

WordPress blogger beautybeyondbones officially took her first major publication live a day before the structure essay appeared, the thirty-first of August.  Bloom:  A Journal by BeautyBeyondBones draws sensitive females into a true story about a real battle with an eating disorder.  The Bloom book launch is discussed with WordPress here:  https://beautybeyondbones.com/get-my-book


I know beautybeyondbones because she had the kindness in her heart to favorably interpret a few of my up-to-date blog entries, which if you are of a similar mind you can visit with the help of this list:








I wish beautybeyondbones good luck with the success of her book.  Take another look here:  https://beautybeyondbones.com/2017/08/31/my-book-launch


Personally, I have a hundred or so blog posts, and I want to update a few of the ones that are half-decent, to trash a few of the worst, and to write many altogether new posts, being optimistic that there will be more good daily prompts and photo challenges which can be explored and interpreted in a variety of ways.

 Sunday, September 3, 2017

Even without being a big success, you can kind of make friends by blogging and there is something in it that keeps you feeling young, as when in my case I didn’t think I would ever have a blog on the Internet, because for a long time I didn’t know what a blog was!  If you find pleasure in writing for the purpose of self-publishing, and you aren’t too bashful to permit yourself to blog, it could be the hobby that gives you more purpose in addition to everything else you do.


You’re welcome to “like” this post, or to venture a comment and/or to “follow” my blog.  Thank you for reading.